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Latest Veterinary Jobs

Aug 17, 2019
Glacier Animal Hospital is seeking energetic, team-oriented individuals to fill Full-Time Veterinarian Technician, Full-Time Receptionist, Part-Time Kennel Assistant positions. We emphasize exceptional veterinary care and client communication, so people skills are a must! Benefits include paid time off for full time positions, a retirement plan and a quality work environment. Experience is desired, but will train the right individuals. The position requires weekend and holiday availability. recblid 7vofxcsl418uitnvx43c4nveld358q
Glacier Animal Hospital Columbia Falls, MT 59912, USA
Aug 17, 2019
$5,000.00 Signing Bonus & Relocation Assistance North Idaho Animal Hospital is seeking a certified veterinary technician to join our practice in Sandpoint Idaho and work with Dr. Marty Becker where Fear Free started. We are a six-doctor practice that is AAHA and Fear Free certified. Check out link below to get a birds eye view of Sandpoint. Full time positions with complete benefit package and competitive wages available. The average work week will be 30-35 hours with rotating weekends. Applicants need to be cheerful, friendly, professional attitude, dependable, have strong work ethic, clear communication skills, proactive, enjoys being busy and multitasking. Proficiency in the following is required: computer skills, animal handling/ restraint, knowledge of medication and prescription foods, autoclave, radiography, light lab work and anesthesia. Other aspects of the job will entail cleaning, stocking, properly wrapping surgical packs, cleaning surgical instruments and daily hospital maintenance. Please email resume to ,$5,000.00 Signing Bonus & Relocation Assistance North Idaho Animal Hospital is seeking a certified veterinary technician to join our practice in Sandpoint Idaho and work with Dr. Marty Becker where Fear Free started. We are a six-doctor practice that is AAHA and Fear Free certified. Check out link below to get a birds eye view of Sandpoint. Full time positions with complete benefit package and competitive wages available. The average work week will be 30-35 hours with rotating weekends. Applicants need to be cheerful, friendly, professional attitude, dependable, have strong work ethic, clear communication skills, proactive, enjoys being busy and multitasking. Proficiency in the following is required: computer skills, animal handling/ restraint, knowledge of medication and prescription foods, autoclave, radiography, light lab work and anesthesia. Other aspects of the job will entail cleaning, stocking, properly wrapping surgical packs, cleaning surgical instruments and daily hospital maintenance. Please email resume to recblid 4ee1bowhelpfujb38pcnygmerizmrx
North Idaho Animal Hospital Sandpoint, ID 83864, USA
Aug 17, 2019
$5,000.00 Signing Bonus & Relocation Assistance. North Idaho Animal Hospital is seeking a certified veterinary technician to join our practice in Sandpoint Idaho and work with Dr. Marty Becker where Fear Free started. We are a six-doctor practice that is AAHA and Fear Free certified. Check out link below to get a bird's eye view of Sandpoint. Full time positions with complete benefit package and competitive wages available. The average work week will be 30-35 hours with rotating weekends. Applicants need to be cheerful, friendly, professional attitude, dependable, have strong work ethic, clear communication skills, proactive, enjoys being busy and multitasking. Proficiency in the following is required: computer skills, animal handling/ restraint, knowledge of medication and prescription foods, autoclave, radiography, light lab work and anesthesia. Other aspects of the job will entail cleaning, stocking, properly wrapping surgical packs, cleaning surgical instruments and daily hospital maintenance. 320 South Ella Sandpoint recblid 31p0orpjfcefnjjuca5ie9dmcps9do
North Idaho Animal Hospital Spokane, WA, USA

Latest From the Blog

You find your veterinary clinic understaffed but are having trouble filling positions quickly enough. The longer your clinic has open veterinary jobs, the more taxing it will become for your remaining staff, and you. Being understaffed can lead to difficulties in all aspects of your veterinary practice. When understaffed, your other staff members have to take on a greater workload, which can lead to an increase in their stress and potential errors. It can also jeopardize your remaining staff, because the stress of picking up the slack will begin to take its toll on them and eventually, they will begin to become burned out themselves.  While it may seem like simply paying your remaining staff overtime is the best way to go about dealing with being understaffed, this can lead to burnout that spreads throughout your entire veterinary clinic. It is much more expensive in the long run to pay overtime to fill in the gaps. The cost to replace an employee in veterinary medicine is between 50 and 75 percent of their annual salary, and this number goes up the more specialized they are in their field. So, risking losing employees to burnout because you are short-staffed is going to cost you much more in the long run than it would have been to work to keep yourself better staffed and finding replacements quickly when you lose someone. Slowly but surely your employees will begin to lose patience with your patients, or at least their patients' humans, which can lead to you losing clients in addition to risking losing employees. Compassion fatigue will begin to settle in, and your staff may begin thinking of leaving the field altogether. Most metro areas have a large selection of veterinary clinics, so you are risking losing out on clients to other clinics if your short-staffed status is not remedied as soon as possible. To help keep this from happening, take the time to speak with your team and let them know how much you appreciate their efforts, and ensure them that you are looking for new employees to get yourself fully staffed again. In addition to telling your team how much you appreciate their work, also take the time to show them you appreciate it. This can be done in a number of ways, including giving them gift cards, ordering in a nice lunch for the team, or even giving them additional vacation time once your new staff has been hired and trained; there are, of course, many other ways you can show them your appreciation. If you need to find new, quality veterinary staff, you try using a veterinary staffing agency to help you. Posting your available veterinary jobs on a staffing agency website, like My Veterinary Job Board can help you find quality candidates to fill the veterinary jobs you have open in a reasonable amount of time. This can help connect you to veterinary job hunters in an efficient way that allows you to spend more time with your staff and work, and less time sifting through resumes and hoping the perfect candidate will just leap out of the pages at you.
You finally finished getting your degree in veterinary medicine; all those years of hard work and studying are over, you can finally start your career! The hunt for good veterinarian jobs can be stressful and difficult. It is because of this that in veterinary medicine, as in all fields, the first year in your new career after graduation can be difficult at times, and you may find it overwhelming on occasion. Your journey to success may be a long one, but here are a few tips to help you survive your first year. Find a Mentor Having a mentor to help guide you through the beginning of your veterinarian career can be extremely beneficial. They have already gone through what you are currently going through, so they can give you some valuable insights you will not find anywhere else. Your mentor can help you search for veterinarian jobs, and help you determine which ones not to apply to, since they have been doing this for so much longer that they likely know more about the reputations of local clinics. You never really stop learning, especially in a field that continues to evolve as new science and medicine is discovered, so finding someone who you admire that you can learn from is a great way to get your veterinarian career going. This learning goes both ways; you may have learned about new techniques in school that your mentor has not heard of yet, allowing you to teach them as well.  You can have more than one mentor to learn from too, in fact, it could be even more beneficial if you had two or more mentors to help you. ​ Set Realistic Goals When you set your overall career goals, do not be vague about what you want. It is hard to make a solid plan for the future when your goal is simply to be successful. Without that firm plan for the future, it is difficult to figure out what direction you need to go in to make that happen. If you decide you want to be the top canine heart surgeon in the state, spend time breaking that down. What training do you need to achieve that? What experience do you need?  Breaking down your overall goal into smaller, more manageable ones will help you get to where you want to be, and it will seem like a more attainable goal when you look at just the first stop on your goal roadmap and think "I need to get this much experience in this practice." When you reach that goal, look at the next one, and so on until you finally reach the top. ​ Keep Learning You may be done with school, at least for now, but now you get the hands-on experience to back it all up. You will never truly stop learning.  When you have goals in mind for your career, sit down and figure out what training you need, what skills you need to sharpen, and what knowledge you need to learn. You may not know the answers to those things yet but giving yourself a basic idea is a good way to stay on task. Include this with your goal roadmap and use it to help keep you on track to where you want to be. In a veterinarian career, you truly can learn something new every day. New illnesses and injuries can show up and take you by surprise but try not to let it become overwhelming. Try to avoid showing frustration over having an illness in front of you that is difficult to diagnose, and the tests keep coming back inconclusive. Instead, view it as a learning opportunity to research a new ailment and be willing to share your results when you eventually solve the puzzle in front of you. Also, never be afraid to ask someone for help. There is nothing wrong with asking questions to help you increase your knowledge in any specific area.  ​ Network with Former Classmates Staying in contact with some of your former classmates can help you set up a strong support system, which can help you later on if things get tough. They understand what you are going through even more than a mentor does, because they are currently experiencing similar things. You will have a group that you can talk to when things get difficult, people to vent to, and people to share career-related news with. This network can also be a valuable tool in helping you find a job, by acting as references for you and they may even be able to help you find a job at the clinic they are now working at. Balance Your Life and Work There has been a lot of emphasis in recent years on the importance of having a good balance between your work and your life. Even in a job as demanding as veterinary medicine, you need to remember that your work is not your whole life. This can be an emotionally challenging job at times, so having distractions when you get home, like spending time with your family and friends, can help you shut work out of your mind for a while. Without this option to step away from work for a few hours, you will not be coming back to work refreshed each day, and eventually, you will begin to burn out. So, finding that balance quickly is vital to your veterinarian career and to your overall mental health.
We're so excited to announce that  My Veterinary Job Board  has officially launched! Dedicated to connecting talented people in the veterinary field with practices in need of that talent, our platform is bringing employers and job seekers together. Our goal is to provide an easy way for everyone to find the right match, whether they're looking for a new veterinarian or a new animal hospital. For Veterinary Employers We know that it can be difficult to search for new, talented individuals to fill those gaps in your veterinary practice. Employment of veterinarians in the United States is  growing at a rate  far faster than the average when compared to other industries. This can be great news for those going to school now or looking for a new job, but it can mean a world of stress and frustration to those pet clinics in need of employees. One of the problems when searching for a new associate veterinarian or veterinary technician is that you may feel like you're limited by the people in your area. However, the best talent may not be in your own backyard, and they may not know that you even exist! That's where our  veterinary job board  comes in. We put your practice in front of more people, helping to magnify your search. You can find the right person that will thrive in your team and grow with your business without dealing with  high turnover . For Veterinary Job Seekers Who is  My Veterinary Job Board  for? People in the veterinary field trying to get their first job out of school. Those looking to advance their veterinary career. Individuals struggling in their current job to find a good work/life balance.  Veterinarians are notoriously overworked , but they can often feel like they don't have options. Even worse, applying for jobs in another part of the country can feel about as familiar as job hunting on Mars. For people who are already too busy, it's difficult to find the time to hunt down new employment options. Our  veterinary job board  makes it easier to put those feelers out and find out just how many options you have.  My Veterinary Job Board  is here to help you figure out your big next step. 
Our new veterinary job board is a great place to start the process of acquiring veterinary professionals for your practice or advancing your own veterinary career.  Find the right match for your next step forward, whether that's adding a new team member or finding newer and better employment opportunities outside your own backyard. We know that the ideal candidate or position is out there waiting for you. Post your job or resume today!
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